Patagonia

End of June

End of June

I’ve been so busy I’ve not been able to devote time to my Blog, this is in part due to personal shooting and guiding but also Wifi speed. All my blog entries are created in Word but the images need to be added whilst online and even at low res’ they invariably get cut half way through upload. Since my last entry I’ve spent a week in Torres del Paine, it was a roadside shooting trip with at times rather more ‘roadside’ than I might have expected, more on that later.

Whilst driving between Argentina and Chile I created some GPS tracks and a number of waypoints. If anyone intends to visit Torres del Paine my data would be useful. I’m not going to give out location advice like some sort of E-book. The data concentrates on road entries, gas stations, hotels etc. If you feel this would help you send me a message at info@andrewwaddington. The folder is a mere 1mb so there’s hope even for my Wifi.

I’d like to say that June provided me with an abundance of snow images; the truth is I had almost as much snow in April as I have in June. Of course, winter is a long season out here so there’s plenty of hope for the coming months. El Niño seems to be bringing precipitation but the conditions are too warm for it to fall as snow. Watching the international news I’m noticing that Europe is having the warmest summer on record, India and other parts of Asia are also experiencing similar conditions. Many will wonder what the world will be like for the next generation but in truth, we’re probably looking at huge changes within this one. Here in Los Glaciers N.P, Torres Glacier, which flows into Laguna Torre, has shrunk by nearly 600’ in two years.

When shooting in Glacier National Park in Montana last year I couldn’t help wondering when they’d feel forced to change the name. Here in Argentina, it’ll take a lot longer for the ice field to melt but glaciers Soucia, Blanca, and Torre are all in rapid decline.

Venticinco de Mayo

Venticinco de Mayo

Going back to Torres del Paine was nice, I don’t enjoy that park quite as much as Los Glaciers but I recognize that my Patagonia photography needs a level of variety. I was in the park with a client; he was responsible for organizing the rental car. He chose a company called Punta Alta, which has an office in Puerto Natales. For those thinking of renting down here, I should tell you that there’s a number of options both here and in Argentina, but it’s my firm opinion that it’s best to rent in Chile. The vehicles are better quality and cheaper. In many cases, there’s no need to use a car in southern Argentina. Several people have come to stay with me in El Chalten and discovered they have no use for their rental car.

Our vehicle appeared to be sturdy enough, however, we had a blowout on the main highway. The tire was shredded so we lost a morning when we had to return it to the rental agency. They were very good about it and swapped the car out for a 4WD, initially, we’d been in a basic saloon car so the swap out was appreciated. We were given a car similar to a Ford F150 pickup with king cab. It was some obscure Korean import but it was fine for our needs.

Unfortunately again with this vehicle, we had our share of problems, a taxi bumped into us causing barely a scuff to us but a healthy dent to him. Our most irritating issue happened on the shore of Lago Pehoe within the park. I was driving at the time, I felt sure the car had a flat and was just about to pull over when the car lurched to the side and the rear wheel flew off barrelling down the road. It came to rest just feet away from the top of an embankment, a little faster and the wheel would have landed in the lake. It transpired not only had the wheel lugs been lost but also one of the studs was missing, in fact, one nut was missing on all four wheels. So whilst I was able to steal a lug from each wheel I was still forced to drive with two lugs missing from each wheel. We were able to contact the rental agency, the staff was actually very helpful, they agreed to send out a new car the following morning.

Car troubles aside we had good conditions for photography in the park. We also spotted Puma; on about the fourth day we noticed a group of three, some distance off by a lakeshore. Later I would disturb two Pumas from a guanaco snack, this was somewhat closer to hand but once they spotted me they were off like a shot.

Back in Argentina, I prepare for my next client who arrives 24 hours from now.

Monochrome seemed to work nicely here

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I might do a run of monochrome


First week of June

First week of June

Things are going to get really busy soon; I have two more people joining me to photograph out here. Unfortunately, Nagesh Mahadev wasn’t able to get a visa so I have his two friends arriving on the 12th. Neither of them has been to Patagonia before so I’m looking forward to showing them around. We’re getting some great weather; the mountains have been visible nearly every day for the past week or two. Many a time Fitz Roy will be hidden in cloud during the day only to appear late in the afternoon shrouded in low but extremely photogenic clouds. We also had a dump of snow and more is forecasted. Thankfully we’ve had no high winds, so although cold it’s been quite manageable even hiking at night, in fact, night hiking, especially under moonlight has been nothing short of magical.

A few days ago I was fortunate enough to be introduced to the great grandson of the original settler in the town. Fitz Roy Madsen – or Roy as he prefers to be called – lives on his families land. Their house is on the far side of the river that runs through the edge of town. He was kind enough to invite me to visit his home and he spoke at length about his family history. His great grandfather built the house on his own in 1903, he was supposed to be helped by a friend, that friend left one day to go and get supplies but never returned. So Madsen senior got to spend his first winter alone. In recent years the family has had problems trying to hang onto their parcel of land. The Madsen family thought the National Park were pushing them out and so due to these fears they were swindled out of 99% of their land by a corrupt lawyer. Roy actually lost the home for a time and had to live in Rio Gallegos, which is such a miserable town, it has one of Argentina’s highest rates of suicide. Roy now has the house back and lives there on his own but shows it to tourists during the busier seasons. Roy thinks I’m mad staying here over winter, I think he assumes I’m a wanted man. He’s going to spend his winter in Paris!

Fitz Roy Madsen great great grandson of the original settler

Fitz Roy Madsen great, great grandson of the original settler

Back in April, the park had its highest rainfall in 15 years, the park was flooded. I was fortunate to be able to get a great photograph. I shot a normally dry lakebed flooded with a lovely view of Fitz Roy, the fall colors were still just clinging to life in the scene, so it was a very lucky shot. Unfortunately, the park suffered quite a bit of damage especially from people trekking on the muddy trails. Since that flooding, the park officials have had a meeting and discussed issues surrounding the increasing numbers of visitors to Los Glaciers. They won’t tell me their plans in full detail but it looks as though certain restrictions will be placed on visitors in the future. For the time being, they are insisting that everyone who hikes past the 5km point must fill in a form to tell the Rangers their plans. Typically you don’t know this until you reach the 5km point. So if you were to hike into the park now you’d get to the 5km point and be threatened that if you went further you’d get fined.

To top off these issues I now have to tell the rangers if I want to go off trail. Officially even if you step off the trail by one meter you’re breaking the rules. I think I’m going to have to get a VHF radio to contact the park service, by radio I can request permission. This brings with it further problems, it seems the park service operate a radio frequency that is outside the scope of radios purchased outside Argentina. So I’d have to buy from an Argentine dealer at more than double the Amazon price. I suppose having a radio is a good idea, I do have the security of knowing that in an emergency I should be able to get help.

Arroyo del Salto after a break in the clouds

Arroyo del Salto after a break in the clouds

Just a slight change in water flow created these gorgeous fingers as the water falls over the rocks.

Just a slight change in water flow and it all looks so different

The polariser cuts through glare to show lovely detail of the river bed

The polariser cuts through glare to show lovely detail of the river bed

Hiking and photographing within mountainous countryside require an ability to recognize weather patterns and adapt accordingly. We had a pressure system that brought a few days of clear weather, it obviously wasn’t photogenic but when the forecast predicted a rapid change I decided to set off into the mountains. On my way through the high street, I bumped into my landlady and I casually asked her if she might know someone who had a VHF radio. She got on the phone and ten minutes later I was given a radio on loan from a local climber. I did well; the following day both climber and landlady were leaving El Chalten for the winter. I’ve now got a heavy radio to lug around but at least I have a level of security.

Added safety for me and those who choose to visit

Added safety for me and those who choose to visit

Once back out on the trails, I found the snow to be quite deep and it only got deeper the higher I went. My plan was to scout out an area I’d visited a month earlier and hopefully use snow detail for my foreground. When I’m scouting on my own I try to always take a different route and so I went off the trail just before the tree line, out here the trees and bushes have adapted to high winds and so they can be almost impenetrable. You might find a way into a grove of trees but the bushes – as I soon found out – make A-B travel immensely difficult. Top this off with thigh deep powder snow and not quite frozen marshland and you’re heading for some very difficult terrain.

Shooting sunset wasn’t what I’d hoped for. I got a pretty good red sky but wasn’t able to find a worthy composition. Faced with the options of a night bivvying in below freezing temperatures with a storm due, or hiking out in the dark I opted for the long hike back under headlamp. The hike in had been tough, the dense underbrush had really slowed me down so I attempted a to return via a different route. After all there’s no exploration if you take the simple route every time. It turned out to be quite a lot harder than I’d expected. I switched on my GPS noticing that there was a hiking trail only 1km away. That kilometer ended up taking about two hours as I was continually caught up in some of the thickest bushes I’ve ever had the misfortune to come across. I didn’t like to look at my GPS too much so I was keeping my eyes peeled for signs of a hiking trail. Obviously, it was buried under snow so I just went by dead reckoning and watched for signs; sawn tree branches, hewn logs or slashes on trees. In the end, it was a pool of yellow snow that signified the trail. I pulled out my GPS and I was right on the trail. I couldn’t help laughing at the absurdity; the happiest part of the hike was when I found a streak of piss.

Later when I loaded my route into my GPS mapping software it showed I’d done not one but several figure eights as I’d worked my way through the bushes. I think it’s clear I won’t be going back that way.

Deep snow but no composition

Deep snow but no composition


Cascada Veinticinco de Mayo Moon burst

Veinticinco de Mayo

Veinticinco de Mayo

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It requires an exceptionally heavy rainfall to capture this cascade at its best.  It rains surprisingly infrequently on the east side of the Andes, so whenever the river flow was high I’d head out and try to shoot here. Having found the cascade on the 25th of May, and because this date is a national holiday in Argentina, I decided to use this title.  In order to capture the moon burst with my Nikon 14-24mm lens, I had to shoot the moon burst at f18.  I fired off several frames as the moon set behind Loma de las Pizarras; later I’d be able to choose the best moon burst to blend into the image. Once the moon set, I quickly re-adjusted my aperture to f4 in order to shoot the foreground. One would imagine as the moon set behind the mountain the foreground would be very dark. However, there was still plenty of ambient light for the perfect exposure.

Here’s a few more:

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An expensive shoot

An expensive shoot

Returning to El Chalten the Vietnamese were itching to get out in the park and shoot Fitz Roy. Call me superstitious but I felt that I’d give them the best chance of getting great light if I didn’t take my camera, plus I’d agreed to porter a bag of food for them. I had no idea how much food they expected me to carry and had to draw the line when I saw two half-kilo tins of peaches! As it turned out my superstitions were right, the first morning in the park was spectacular with a red sky from the east. Fitz Roy was clear but had great clouds behind. I watched with envy as the group dispersed choosing their own compositions. They didn’t need me to help, but it was interesting to see one member of the group find the best comp’ he was taking advantage red glow on the water, which from his position was quite magical. Unfortunately, he broke his Gitzo tripod; perhaps he pulled out the leg a bit aggressively. The leg broke away from the upper shoulder of the tripod. Attempting to support the camera with a broken tripod resulted in him then dropping his Canon 5d3 with 16-35mm lens in the water. I tried to convince him that nothing could be gained from turning the camera back on and trying again. Unfortunately, he’d also missed his opportunity, as the light was gone. He couldn’t be convinced and so turned on a wet camera. Shortly later the camera turned itself off and refused to work. By good fortune, he had a spare body back in town so I returned to town and collected his 5d2.

I’m now worried about my own Gitzo, mine is only two months old and the carbon fiber on the outside of the legs has already started to delaminate. I’d give a lot to have an RRS tripod here with me right now.

The leaves fall

I’m now entering the last week of April, the are leaves beginning to fall quickly, there’s still some amazing color, some of the leaves are the same tint as my Fotodiox filter pouches but the best of the color has now passed and the valley is predominantly brown. I can’t deny that I’m looking forward to some down time. I’ve been hiking hard for the past two months and I’ve lost quite a lot of weight. If you minus the usual male appendages I’m now sporting a thigh gap most girls would envy. I clearly need to spend some time recuperating and preparing for the winter. I’m soon to be joined by Mark Metternich so rest will have to wait. He’ll join me for a couple of weeks. I’m looking forward to doing some shooting with him. The moon is waxing so we will try some night photography and of course we’ll do a lot of off-trail scouting. Mark has promised to help me with processing so I hope to bring some new images to my blog posts.

Coming into May

During peak season El Chalten is a buzzing tourist town, throughout summer and fall local businesses have enjoyed their largest turnover and it looks to improve year after year. The town itself was only founded in 1985 but it’s rapidly become one of the most heavily visited towns in the country.   All that changes in the winter, the town’s population dwindles to a mere three or four hundred. Seasonal workers head back to cities such as Buenos Aires and the local residents get the place pretty much to themselves.

Of course, this migration of tourists and seasonal workers means there’s plenty of accommodation sitting idle during the colder months. If it were not for this I would be unable to afford to live in my rented holiday chalet. As I write I’m now in the first week of May, the leaves have fallen from all but the lowest trees in the valley and we’re gradually experiencing less and less favorable weather.

Mark Metternich, who’s photographing with me at the moment has been hoping for some dramatic skies and I have to admit that I thought he would have a very slim chance of getting the high drama lenticular clouds that I shot some weeks earlier. I might be pessimistic but it’s hard for me not to draw on my previous experiences during 2010 and 2012 when I managed not one drama filled sunset.

Mark and I have been trying to shoot moonsets over Fitz Roy. Hiking out into the park in the dead of night.  Then hanging around for a few hours really messes up with your body clock, especially when trying to keep an eye on sunrise and sunset as well. On May 1st Ted Gore who’d just returned from shooting in Chile joined us for what would be an unsuccessful shoot. We had the perfect mix of clouds and stars but just at the moment the moon set behind the mountain the clouds all disappeared.Returning to town Ted and myself attempted a sunrise shoot leaving Mark to catch up on sleep.

By late afternoon of the 2nd, the clouds were starting to build into what looked to be a promising sunset. Call it superstitious but I felt that if I waited for Mark to shoot on his own he would get a drama filled sky. I decided to wait in the house, with Mark off on his own I was left alone and so busied myself with household chores. Every so often I would glance out the window watching as the skies became more and more promising. Finally, I decided to hell with it, I couldn’t miss out. I picked up my camera and with tripod in hand, camera in the other I literally ran from the house.

Mark was shooting a great view looking down into the valley, it’s a well-known vista and I’ve shot it before but of course one can always improve. I found Mark crouched around his tripod, shivering but totally elated at what was clearly becoming a great sunset. I arrived in the nick of time and managed to pull off several shots with 3 condors flying in and out of the composition.

A full-grown condor has a wingspan up to 9′ across. They are huge and instantly recognizable. Of course shooting a condor circling 100’ above you with a 24mm lens gives the impression of a much smaller bird. It was for this reason that I decided to do something I’ve never done before in my photography. I decided to shoot the bird at a larger focal length and blend it in later in post to my image. This kind of editing really pushes my ethical boundaries. A lot of photographers wouldn’t think twice about doing such a thing but I consider myself something of a traditionalist and I really wrestle with the ethics of doing this.

As we move on into the winter I’ve got untold ideas, as Marc Adamus told me nothing changes a landscape quite as much as snow and ice. Keep following and please remember my images are all processed on a laptop so please forgive color inaccuracies.


Guiding

Guiding

About a year ago I started putting together plans to guide photographers in the El Chalten area. I wanted to get some experience guiding people without too much pressure, essentially I wanted to get a feel for what it’s like to manage a group and actually see if I enjoyed doing it. I’m not one to jump in at the deep end so I created a plan to guide photographers entirely for free. It was my hope that by inviting reputable photographers I might get some free publicity when they uploaded images to social media.

By mid-March with only weeks before I was due to leave I got emails telling me that several members of the group had to cancel.

Fortunately, I was put in touch with two groups of photographers who already had bookings to fly to Patagonia. It was agreed almost overnight that I would guide each group for a week. The first group were from Thailand and the second from Vietnam, I would also keep a Chinese photographer from my original group; Jiqing Fan was the only member to stick with me right through from the start. Of all the people I thought most likely to pull out I thought it would be him. Only a few months earlier Jiqing had been in a car accident up in Canada during the winter. He’d been driving on a snow covered road had missed a bend and drove straight into a river. Forced to swim to shore the car was submerged for almost a day and all Jiqings camera and computer gear was ruined.

The Vietnamese Group, notice the lenticular clouds building in the background

The Vietnamese Group, notice the lenticular clouds building in the background

From the moment the Thai’ and Vietnamese groups agreed to let me guide them I felt extremely positive. They were wonderful people and all were extremely grateful for my help. The Thai group enjoyed some excellent hiking and some great conditions; I think it’s true to say that they were in the park during peak fall color.

The Vietnamese group arrived late in the afternoon of the 16th April. We were able to rush straight out and get a great sunset. The lenticular clouds had been building throughout the afternoon and it looked to be a killer sunset. I took the group to the gorge about 7km out of town. There are several spots to shoot from along the Rio de las Vueltas and I’m convinced we were at the best location. The sky didn’t light up as I’d hoped but there was still great color under the clouds and of course amazing detail in the lenticulars. I spoke later to other photographers who shot within the park and it would seem that we’d got to just the right location. I would later meet Marc Adamus, he himself had never seen this composition and liked it very much.

With bad weather forecast for the El Chalten area, we decided to rush to Torres del Paine. For me, this provided a welcoming break and an opportunity to scout some new areas. I was also able to meet up with Mark Metternich and Greg Boratyn who were both leading their workshop in the area.

That strange backpack sure has its uses.

That strange backpack sure has its uses.

 


River Dance

River Dance

River Dance

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As a photographer, there’s little more exciting that witnessing an amazing sunset. Here on the Rio de las Vueltas the lenticular clouds beautifully complement the curve of the river.

Here’s a few more:

44mins before sunrisePre sunrisePre SunriseSingle image late evening 30mins before sunriseLenticular clouds after sunsetMoonless high isoPathetic snow levelssunset40 second exposureSlightly upstream

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Patagonia mid March

Patagonia mid-March

I live in the north end of El Chalten so I’m one of those who can’t see the mountain from my house. Not that there’s much benefit to living on the south side because the mountains are so regularly hidden in clouds it only makes a difference on a few days in the month. No matter, I still get out as much as possible, I’m either out in the mountains in my tent or if I’m in town I’ll wake up and get out to a location for sunrise.

A young guy walks a 60 metre slackline high above the town.

A young guy walks a 60-metre slackline high above the town.

The morning of the 13th I woke up to thick dark rain clouds so I didn’t venture far. By mid-morning the conditions had improved and the weather forecast looked promising, even the wind had dropped from near hurricane.

Dragging myself out onto the street I set off to the south end of town, once there I got a glimpse of Mount Fitz Roy, there’d been a fine layer of snow in the night so the mountain was impressive and with a fine shroud of mist it took on a kind of ethereal look to it. Even though I was in the middle of town I couldn’t help taking out my camera and grabbing a shot. It was then I realized my camera’s battery was flat, the camera must have turned itself on and slowly drained the battery, this was Friday the 13th after all. Thankfully I had a spare, I’d learned that lesson a few days earlier when I missed out on a killer sunrise due to the same problem.

I’m a serious devotee of Google Earth and with the benefit of satellite imagery, I was able to locate a small pond at an area I’d never visited before. Despite being relatively close to town it took me a good hour and a half to access the pond. As soon as you step off trail you’re forced to struggle with the undergrowth, which can be very tiresome. Deep in the forest I disturbed a Huemul, the animal looks like a common deer with small horns, it’s not very impressive but it’s an endangered animal and it’s particularly rare to see one. Apparently, many of the locals have never seen one, this was my second sighting, back in 2012 I managed to photograph one, this time the animal ran off before I could get my camera out.

The pond proved interesting there wasn’t much water which considering the amount of rain we’ve had was surprising but I could tell it offered a nice composition especially if Cerro Torre was visible.

A shot from the river.

Rio de las Vueltas

Rio de las Vueltas

That evening Fitz Roy drifted in and out of the clouds. The mountains are rarely photogenic at sunset but you never know if you’re going to see them in the morning so I ended up using a lot of battery power shooting around sunset. I’d found another composition, one with the Rio Fitz Roy creating an interesting leading line as it came in through a gorge.

I spent the night with the battery tucked into my sleeping bag to stop it getting too cold. My tent was pitched in a perfect location so I only had to look out in the morning in order to see if Fitz Roy was visible. Sunrise was around 7.30am, at 7.00 the mountain wasn’t so impressive, I remember not being in any particular hurry to get set up as it didn’t look like I’d be getting a shot.

I set the camera up tying the tripod down to a heavy rock, I composed, focussed and only then put the battery in. It was showing just two bars of power so I knew it was on its last legs. This would be like shooting with film, like shooting large format where every exposure would cost serious money. Shooting Fitz Roy is dependent on three weather systems, preferably you need a cloudless sky to the east, a relatively clear system in the town, i.e. in front of the mountains but more importantly, you need clouds on the ice field behind the mountains. It’s a lot to ask for and unfortunately, it can be very frustrating especially when you need those three systems to work for you right at sunrise.

Thankfully on the morning of the 14th, I everything seemed to work nicely for me. I hung out all morning foraging for wild berries, never venturing too far from the tripod whilst always keeping an eye on the sky. At around 9.00am I managed to shoot the rainbow with a pretty impressive sky lingering over Fitz Roy. Unfortunately, Cerro Torre remained completely hidden in the clouds but I know I’ll be back to this location.

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Fitz Roy from unique vantage point


Marble Caves

Marble Caves

Marble Caves

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Carved into the Patagonian Andes, the Cuevas de Mármol are located on a peninsula of solid marble bordering Lake General Carrera, a remote glacial lake that spans the Chile-Argentina border.

Formed by 6,000-plus years of waves washing up against calcium carbonate, the smooth, swirling blues of the cavern walls are a reflection of the lake’s azure waters, which change in intensity and hue, depending on water levels and time of year.  I made two trips to this area, on the first occasion there was a little too much water, the lake was lower on my second visit. I tried shooting over the course of five days so I could see the way the light and cloud cover affected water color throughout the day. Finally on the fifth day a high pressure system lowered water levels even more and I was able to capture even more of the otherwise submerged marble.

 


Branch Out

Birds Eye rrr

Branch Out

I photographed in Patagonia for much of 2015/16; from my cabin in the small town of El Chalten I was able to access deep into the heart of Los Glaciers National Park. Some days I would need a break from hiking, but I would always keep an eye on the sky, because if the clouds looked promising I would be able to run to this tree in under 20 minutes. In all my time photographing the park I only ever saw condors here on two occasions. I should point out that it was necessary to take two pictures to create this image. I used a wide angle lens to photograph the tree, in doing so the condor appeared tiny. It’s 9′ wingspan was miniaturized with the effect of using such a wide focal length. Therefore I pushed my processing boundaries and shot the bird separately with a longer focal length and later added it to the image.  This image does make a more accurate representation of the scene.

Here’s a couple more from the same location:

 

 

 

 

 


One fine morning

One fine morning

One fine morning

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I think I’d been out to try shooting this pond somewhere in the region of thirty times. I remember waking in my tent one morning and realising that not only was Fitz Roy visible but it was also calm, there wasn’t a breath of wind. Unfortunately when I got to the pond it had iced over during the night! I had a half an hour before sunrise, as the pond was only thigh deep I decided to wade in and try to shift some of the ice onto the bank. This of course proved futile, I could bare the cold but I couldn’t grasp the ice in my hands. With time ticking away I knew I had to head for another composition, as luck would have it this larger and deeper pond was not frozen. The composition was rushed, I believe this one is better here but as you’ll notice the fall colors are far better in this shot.

 


Salto Grande Sunrise

Salto Grande

Salto Grande

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An older shot of Salto Grande taken around 2010, the swirling clouds were an added bonus. This particular composition is particularly dependent on correct water flow.

Cuernos Torres del Paine

Cuernos Torres del Paine

Pehoe Motel under moonlight

Pehoe Motel under moonlight

The Cuernos

The Cuernos

Lago Pehoe xxx

Lago Pehoe

Salto Grande Sunrise

Salto Grande Sunrise

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Cerro Torre

Beautiful Light

Winter sunrise on Cerro Torre can be mind blowing and because of the low angle of the sun it’s possible to shoot quite late into the morning. This shot was taken at 240mm focal length on a full frame camera. Here’s a few more from the same area taken at various times throughout the year:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Cerro Madsen

_ACW4487-Edit-copyFrom a relatively high altitude Cerro Madsen offers spectacular views of the Fitz Roy range. As usual I had to make several visits to this location before capturing anything worthwhile.I share here some other images taken in the vicinity:

 

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Fitz Roy

Fitz Roy

High winds produce some of the most dramatic skies in Patagonia.

One more from the same location:

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Laguna Misterio

Normally a dry lake bed, but after the heaviest rainfall in over a decade, a sizeable lake formed here.

Here’s a couple more from the same location. The image with the windblown grasses shows how dry the lake bed usually is.

 

 

 

 

 


Arroyo del Salto

_ACW3869The most popular trek in Los Glaciers National Park is the hike to Laguna de los Tres, which leaves from the north of El Chalten. The trail splits after about 4km, the left fork branches off to Laguna Capri whilst the right fork makes a more direct track to Poincenot Camp, and the steep climb to the ever popular lake. Whilst the lake has much to offer the small stream flowing through the park offers multiple opportunities for photographers.  Typically it’s best to shoot from here at sunrise although in truth excellent photography is possible at all times of the day and night. A strong hiker can reach this river area in a little over an hour from town, therefore it’s quite possible depart from town in the dark and reach here for sunrise, or a pre dawn as seen in this image.

Here’s a few more:

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untitled-2906-Edit-copyArroyo del Salto_AAA4373-copy_ACW0775-copy 2