Posts tagged “grand canyon

Nankoweap Granaries

Nankoweap Granaries

Nankoweap Granaries

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The Nankoweap Trail is considered the hardest of all the named trails in the Grand Canyon, with a vertical drop just shy of 6000′ and an almost year round lack of water it is not to be taken lightly. I’ve hiked this 22 mile trail twice, both times from the trailhead on the north rim. Trail descriptions suggest this is a mostly waterless trail, that was certainly my experience. The trail is not recommended for people with a fear of heights. The majority of hikers take two days to complete the journey, spending the night on the way down at either Marion Point or Tilted Mesa; to do so requires carrying plenty of extra water.

My biggest fear was leaving my car overnight in a remote area, therefore I would hike down and back out in a single day. I took this image in the blue hour. The ruins are reconstructed so I felt it was justifiable to illuminate them with candles.

I was fortunate to capture the last light from a setting sun on a cumulonimbus cloud. My return was made under headlamp in the dark but cooler hours.


Toroweep Point

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Toroweep Point

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A visit to the more touristy areas of the Grand Canyon can be a frustrating affair, parking lots are often crowded with over sized American vehicles. Viewpoints may be crammed with hundreds of foreign tourists all clamouring to take the all important selfie. Fortunately there’s Toroweep Point, it’s not unusual, particularly on weekdays to have the entire place to yourself. Toroweep is one of the narrowest parts of the canyon and with a vertical 3000′ drop to the Colorado River the view is nothing short of spectacular.  The best time to visit is during the summer monsoons, however, the 60 mile dirt access road becomes impassible when wet so visitors need to be prepared.

Here’s a couple:

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Havasu Falls

Back in August 2008 a flash flood devastated the remote waterfalls at Havasupai on the south side of the Grand Canyon in Arizona. The Navajo who live in the remote village of Supai spent months clearing up debris left over from the flood. By the time I visited on Christmas Day 2011 the debris was removed, but the falls were altered forever. Havasu Falls (pictured) used to have two spouts.  Also there were no travertine pools at the base of Mooney Falls, these will take many years to recover. It was still a wonderful experience and a great place to spend Christmas Day.

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